Speaker Series 2016: Cougar Awareness

The final session of the 2016 Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Speaker Series is a presentation by Jeff Zimmer, Fish and Wildlife Officer for the Drumheller district with Alberta Justice and Solicitor General on Thursday, April 28. The recent sighting of a cougar near the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology this spring resulted in a lot of … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Cougar Awareness

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Speaker Series 2016: Searching for Life-bearing Exoplanets in our Galaxy

Exoplanets are planets that exist outside of our solar system. The number of confirmed exoplanets is rapidly growing and now exceeds two thousand. An additional nearly 5,000 exoplanet candidates are awaiting confirmation in the NASA Exoplanet Archive. Most of these planets have been discovered by the NASA Kepler Mission, a space observatory launched by NASA … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Searching for Life-bearing Exoplanets in our Galaxy

Speaker Series 2016: The Amber Trap–Unlocking Stories of Ancient Polar Climates from Fossilized Tree Resin

In this talk, Dr. Annie Quinney, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Arctic Institute of North America at the University of Calgary, presents research on the recent discovery of 90 million-year-old fossil tree resin off the coast of Victoria, Australia. The fossil represents both the oldest amber from Australia and the southern-most occurrence of amber in Gondwana. … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: The Amber Trap–Unlocking Stories of Ancient Polar Climates from Fossilized Tree Resin

Speaker Series 2016: The Rhetoric of Intelligent Design

Christine Shellska is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Communication, Media and Film, Faculty of Arts, at the University of Calgary. Her areas of study include the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and rhetorical methods. In this presentation of competing cultural perspectives, Shellska uses rhetorical analysis, as well as contemporary and classic debate … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: The Rhetoric of Intelligent Design

Speaker Series 2016: Fossils of the Night – The History of Bats Through Time

Bats represent one in every five species of mammals in the world — there are at least 1,300 living species of bats. Not only are bats diverse, but they can be remarkably abundant with some species living in colonies that number in the millions of individuals. Bats are also geographically widespread. They are known from … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Fossils of the Night – The History of Bats Through Time

Speaker Series 2016: Mesozoic Salamanders from Siberia, Kazakhstan, and Middle Asia

Salamanders are a group of amphibians that are easily recognized by their moderately elongate body and tail, two pairs of limbs, and smooth skin. Southern Alberta is home to two kinds of salamander: the tiger salamander on the plains (including in the Drumheller region) and the long-toed salamander in the foothills and Rocky Mountains. Most … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Mesozoic Salamanders from Siberia, Kazakhstan, and Middle Asia

Speaker Series 2016: Whoops! Fossil Faux Pas!

While humans have been misidentifying fossils for thousands of years, right back to the primitive Britons with their Devil's toenails (Gryphea bivalves), fairie hearts (heart urchins), and petrified serpents (ammonites), there are certain horrendous mistakes that the palaeontological community will never forget. Some are quite intentional, where fake fossils have been created to deceive innocent … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Whoops! Fossil Faux Pas!

Speaker Series 2016: The Cretaceous-Palaeogene Mass Extinction: What Do We Really Know?

The Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction is one of the most famous extinction events in Earth’s history, most notably as it marked the end of the Age of Dinosaurs approximately 66 million years ago. Although it is widely known that dinosaurs were wiped out during this event, many other types of animals also went extinct at … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: The Cretaceous-Palaeogene Mass Extinction: What Do We Really Know?

Speaker Series 2016: Uncovering the Hidden Dental Diversity of the First Apex Predators to Identify Canada’s “Dimetrodon borealis”

Although often incorrectly identified as a dinosaur, the iconic sail-backed Dimetrodon was actually an ancient ancestor of today’s mammals. Dating back to the Permian Period, 295-272 million years ago, Dimetrodon was one of the first top predators on land and had several characteristics that made it an efficient predator. Foremost among these was a mouth … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: Uncovering the Hidden Dental Diversity of the First Apex Predators to Identify Canada’s “Dimetrodon borealis”

Speaker Series 2016: British Columbia’s Eocene Lakes and Forests: New Perspectives on Temperate Islands from a Past Greenhouse World

  British Columbia's Eocene Lakes and Forests: New Perspectives on Temperate Islands from a Past Greenhouse World Dr. David R. Greenwood, Brandon University, Manitoba During the early Eocene, about 55 to 50 million years ago, warm climates extended into Canada’s Arctic as far north as Ellesmere Island, supporting biologically rich forests of conifers, broadleaf trees, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2016: British Columbia’s Eocene Lakes and Forests: New Perspectives on Temperate Islands from a Past Greenhouse World