Speaker Series 2017: Mass Extinctions, Ray-Finned Fishes, and the Closing of Romer’s Gap

The actinopterygians, or ray-finned fishes, are a substantial and significant component of modern vertebrate (animals with backbones) diversity. Ray-finned fishes are bony and have paired fins that are supported by rays (the actinosts) that insert directly in the body. Examples of modern ray-finned fishes include trout, eels, and bettas. Despite their prevalence today, the early … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Mass Extinctions, Ray-Finned Fishes, and the Closing of Romer’s Gap

Speaker Series 2017: Sharing Under the Cretaceous Sea: Global Distribution Achieved by Halisaurine Mosasaurs Explained by a New Discovery from Japan

Mosasaurs were large, flipper-bearing swimming lizards from the age of the last dinosaurs, about 100–66 million years ago. Typically reaching the size of a pickup truck in length—and some nearly twice as long—over 70 mosasaur species are reported today based on the fossils collected from all over the world. Out of this highly diverse assemblage, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Sharing Under the Cretaceous Sea: Global Distribution Achieved by Halisaurine Mosasaurs Explained by a New Discovery from Japan

Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Alberta is a great place for a dinosaur palaeontologist, with plenty of preserved skeletons and some of the best evidence for dinosaurs in the world. However, in the Willow Creek Formation of southwestern Alberta, which records the last few million years before the extinction of dinosaurs, only three kinds of dinosaur skeletons have been found: … Continue reading Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Palaeoart inspires scientific research

In the scientific community, art serves as a visual source of influential enlightenment, sparking the curiosity of the general public and researchers alike. The palaeoart entitled “Double Death” by Bob Nicholls depicts an exciting contest between two large theropod dinosaurs, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, fighting over which one will get to eat a medium-sized sauropod dinosaur. The … Continue reading Palaeoart inspires scientific research

Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Speaker Series 2015: “Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology” This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology. In the January 29 edition of the 2015 Speaker Series, Dr. Jim Gardner, Curator of Palaeoherpetology, reflects on the history of the Museum and the accomplishments … Continue reading Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Assessing the Efficacy of Youth Participation in Scientific Research

Speaker Series 2015: “Assessing the Efficacy of Youth Participation in Scientific Research” This week’s session features the Museum’s very own Marcy Belva, Science Educator, who used the Encana Badlands Science Camp as a case study for her Master in Museum Studies degree. Her research included observations of data collection, interviews with scientists and participants, and … Continue reading Assessing the Efficacy of Youth Participation in Scientific Research