Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Alberta is a great place for a dinosaur palaeontologist, with plenty of preserved skeletons and some of the best evidence for dinosaurs in the world. However, in the Willow Creek Formation of southwestern Alberta, which records the last few million years before the extinction of dinosaurs, only three kinds of dinosaur skeletons have been found: … Continue reading Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Over the Heads of Dinosaurs – Pterosaurs!

Speaker Series 2016: “Over the Heads of Dinosaurs – Pterosaurs!” Pterosaurs (“winged reptiles”) appeared at the same time as the first dinosaurs, about 230 million years ago, and went extinct with the last of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Pterosaurs first appear in the fossil record as fully-evolved, specialized, flying animals, so their evolutionary … Continue reading Over the Heads of Dinosaurs – Pterosaurs!

New research describes soft tissue and stomach content of well-preserved pterosaur

A new paper published this month in PeerJ biological and medical sciences journal describes a specimen of the small pterosaur (flying reptile) Rhamphorhynchus. The specimen is noteworthy due to the spectacular preservation of soft tissue, stomach contents, and what’s considered to be coprolite (fossilized poop). Research featured in the journal was the collaborative effort of … Continue reading New research describes soft tissue and stomach content of well-preserved pterosaur

Palaeoart inspires scientific research

In the scientific community, art serves as a visual source of influential enlightenment, sparking the curiosity of the general public and researchers alike. The palaeoart entitled “Double Death” by Bob Nicholls depicts an exciting contest between two large theropod dinosaurs, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, fighting over which one will get to eat a medium-sized sauropod dinosaur. The … Continue reading Palaeoart inspires scientific research

Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

A new paper released in the PLOS One journal describes sclerotic rings in mosasaurs. Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98–66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy … Continue reading Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Speaker Series 2015: “Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology” This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology. In the January 29 edition of the 2015 Speaker Series, Dr. Jim Gardner, Curator of Palaeoherpetology, reflects on the history of the Museum and the accomplishments … Continue reading Money for Nothing—Three Decades of Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Foremost Book on Hadrosaurs Now Available

Hadrosaurs were plant-eating dinosaurs and among the most successful species to have ever lived. Also known as duck-billed dinosaurs, they are one of the best-known groups of dinosaurs due to their abundance in the fossil record, notable diversity, and near global distribution in the Late Cretaceous. In 2011, a collaboration led by Dr. David Eberth … Continue reading Foremost Book on Hadrosaurs Now Available