Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

If you could invent a time machine and hop back 140 million years, to the earliest part of the Cretaceous Period, you would likely see at least one basal iguanodontidian or “iguanodontid.” These ornithischian dinosaurs (the group including ankylosaurs, stegosaurs, horned dinosaurs, and duck-billed dinosaurs) lived all around the globe. The basal iguanodontidians were those at … Continue reading Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

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Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Alberta is a great place for a dinosaur palaeontologist, with plenty of preserved skeletons and some of the best evidence for dinosaurs in the world. However, in the Willow Creek Formation of southwestern Alberta, which records the last few million years before the extinction of dinosaurs, only three kinds of dinosaur skeletons have been found: … Continue reading Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Even tadpoles have a fossil record

One of the most exciting things about the Royal Tyrrell Museum is that it’s more than a Museum, it's an active research facility, so there are exciting things happening all the time that further our understanding of ancient life. Dr. James Gardner, our Curator of Palaeoherpetology (the study of prehistoric reptiles and amphibians), has just … Continue reading Even tadpoles have a fossil record

New Royal Tyrrell Museum research investigates the pace of the dinosaur extinction, and why birds may have survived

One of the most intriguing and enduring aspects of dinosaurs is their extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. After decades of research into this topic, most palaeontologists can agree on several details regarding the dinosaur mass-extinction. First, the extinction was due, at least in part, to an asteroid impact with the Earth at … Continue reading New Royal Tyrrell Museum research investigates the pace of the dinosaur extinction, and why birds may have survived

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Researcher Co-edits Special Collection of Scientific Papers

How do scientists commemorate the career and accomplishments of their colleagues? Not with a party and gifts, but with a “Festschrift,” which is the publication of a special volume of scientific papers written and compiled in dedication to their colleague. Two former researchers at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology each have been honoured with … Continue reading Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Researcher Co-edits Special Collection of Scientific Papers

Fossilized Eggshells Provide Insight into the Evolution of Nesting

Very little is known about the types of nests built by dinosaurs because nest structures and nesting materials do not usually fossilize. Yet what we do know about dinosaur nesting style can suggest information about the nesting behaviours among archosaurs (a group that includes crocodilians, birds, and dinosaurs), particularly associated with the origin of birds. … Continue reading Fossilized Eggshells Provide Insight into the Evolution of Nesting

Dinosaur Injuries Interpreted Through Footprints

A scientific paper published in Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces, called “Vertebrate Ichnopathology: Pathologies Inferred from Dinosaur Tracks and Trackways from the Mesozoic”, focuses in-depth on a rarely published component of palaeontology—ichnopathology. Darren Tanke of the Royal Tyrrell Museum assisted nine other authors from Canada, the United States, and China in … Continue reading Dinosaur Injuries Interpreted Through Footprints

Marine Turtle Research Contributes to Special Edition of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences

To commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology and its contribution to scientific research, the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences released a special edition in August. Included in this special volume is the paper Marine Turtles from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada, a result of collaborative research with renowned scientists … Continue reading Marine Turtle Research Contributes to Special Edition of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences

Special Edition of Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences Celebrates Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Thirty Years of Contributions to Science

Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences Direct link to issue Ottawa, ON (5 August 2015) – Canadian Science Publishing and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology are pleased to announce the release of a special edition of Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences in recognition of the Museum’s thirtieth anniversary on September 25, 2015. The insatiable curiosity … Continue reading Special Edition of Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences Celebrates Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Thirty Years of Contributions to Science

A New Paper by Royal Tyrrell Museum Researcher Investigates Relative Growth in Alligators and Fossils

The body proportions of many animals change as they get larger or older. This can be easily seen in humans, where babies have much larger heads (relative to the rest of the body) than adults. These changes in proportions are often accomplished by different growth rates between body parts, a process called allometry. In the … Continue reading A New Paper by Royal Tyrrell Museum Researcher Investigates Relative Growth in Alligators and Fossils