What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

There is much more to palaeontology than just dinosaurs, although they have a tendency to dominate in popular culture. Palaeontology is the study of the history of all life on Earth, through the fossil record. The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s researchers excavate and study fossils from a diverse range of fields. Our scientists study not only … Continue reading What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

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Why So Big? Understanding the Early Evolution of the Brain in Primates and Their Relatives Using the Fossil Record

In this Speaker Series guest speaker Dr. Mary Silcox of the University of Toronto explores “Why So Big? Understanding the Early Evolution of the Brain in Primates and Their Relatives Using the Fossil Record.” Dr. Silcox’s main research focus is on the earliest evolution of our own Order, the Primates. In particular, she studies fossils of … Continue reading Why So Big? Understanding the Early Evolution of the Brain in Primates and Their Relatives Using the Fossil Record

Changing the World, One Museum Experience at a Time!

Quick question: How much does a polar bear weigh? Just enough to break the ice! This was one of the gems delivered by Dustin and Zak during the Museum Hack Audience Development workshop held recently at the Royal Tyrrell Museum. Museum Hack is a company based out of New York City whose specialty is developing … Continue reading Changing the World, One Museum Experience at a Time!

New research describes soft tissue and stomach content of well-preserved pterosaur

A new paper published this month in PeerJ biological and medical sciences journal describes a specimen of the small pterosaur (flying reptile) Rhamphorhynchus. The specimen is noteworthy due to the spectacular preservation of soft tissue, stomach contents, and what’s considered to be coprolite (fossilized poop). Research featured in the journal was the collaborative effort of … Continue reading New research describes soft tissue and stomach content of well-preserved pterosaur

A New Paper by Royal Tyrrell Museum Researcher Investigates Relative Growth in Alligators and Fossils

The body proportions of many animals change as they get larger or older. This can be easily seen in humans, where babies have much larger heads (relative to the rest of the body) than adults. These changes in proportions are often accomplished by different growth rates between body parts, a process called allometry. In the … Continue reading A New Paper by Royal Tyrrell Museum Researcher Investigates Relative Growth in Alligators and Fossils

The Warm Fuzzies: Mammals and Climate Change in the Eocene of North America

Speaker Series 2015:  “The Warm Fuzzies: Mammals and Climate Change in the Eocene of North America” The Eocene Epoch (~55.5 to 35 million years ago) encompasses a number of significant climatic events in addition to well-documented immigration and extinction events that played an integral part in determining the current distribution of mammals across North America. … Continue reading The Warm Fuzzies: Mammals and Climate Change in the Eocene of North America

A Year in the Life of the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeontology Lab

Speaker Series 2015:  “A Year in the Life of the Royal Tyrrell Museum's Palaeontology Lab” With hundreds of fossils being collected every year in Alberta, the preparation laboratory of the Royal Tyrrell Museum is a busy place. As fossils are being cleaned and sent away for study or display, new discoveries constantly roll in through … Continue reading A Year in the Life of the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeontology Lab

Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

A new paper released in the PLOS One journal describes sclerotic rings in mosasaurs. Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98–66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy … Continue reading Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

Alberta: Land of Dinosaurs and Other Palaeontological Wonders

Royal Tyrrell Museum Speaker Series celebrates 140 years of dinosaur discoveries in Alberta. Dr. François Therrien from the Royal Tyrrell Museum on “Alberta: Land of Dinosaurs and Other Palaeontological Wonders.” In addition to the Rocky Mountains and its oil industry, Alberta enjoys an international reputation for another type of natural resource: dinosaurs. Based on the … Continue reading Alberta: Land of Dinosaurs and Other Palaeontological Wonders

Preparation Lab Timelapse @RoyalTyrrell

Preparation Lab technicians of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology work with fossils as they are made ready for research and display. Doing so takes great patience and care to ensure that specimens are safely handled and prepared, guaranteeing that they will reveal all they have to offer to the scientists who will soon be … Continue reading Preparation Lab Timelapse @RoyalTyrrell