Speaker Series 2017: Discovery, Geological Context and Challenges of Dating a New Hominin, Homo naledi, from the Rising Star Cave, South Africa

The discovery of Homo naledi, a new species of hominin (the group encompassing modern humans, extinct human species, and all close human ancestors) was announced in September 2015. Found in a deep, nearly inaccessible cave system, this was the largest concentration of hominin bones ever found in Africa. The unusual distribution of bones suggested symbolic … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Discovery, Geological Context and Challenges of Dating a New Hominin, Homo naledi, from the Rising Star Cave, South Africa

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Speaker Series 2017: Mass Extinctions, Ray-Finned Fishes, and the Closing of Romer’s Gap

The actinopterygians, or ray-finned fishes, are a substantial and significant component of modern vertebrate (animals with backbones) diversity. Ray-finned fishes are bony and have paired fins that are supported by rays (the actinosts) that insert directly in the body. Examples of modern ray-finned fishes include trout, eels, and bettas. Despite their prevalence today, the early … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Mass Extinctions, Ray-Finned Fishes, and the Closing of Romer’s Gap

Speaker Series 2017: Sharing Under the Cretaceous Sea: Global Distribution Achieved by Halisaurine Mosasaurs Explained by a New Discovery from Japan

Mosasaurs were large, flipper-bearing swimming lizards from the age of the last dinosaurs, about 100–66 million years ago. Typically reaching the size of a pickup truck in length—and some nearly twice as long—over 70 mosasaur species are reported today based on the fossils collected from all over the world. Out of this highly diverse assemblage, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Sharing Under the Cretaceous Sea: Global Distribution Achieved by Halisaurine Mosasaurs Explained by a New Discovery from Japan

Marine Turtle Research Contributes to Special Edition of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences

To commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology and its contribution to scientific research, the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences released a special edition in August. Included in this special volume is the paper Marine Turtles from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada, a result of collaborative research with renowned scientists … Continue reading Marine Turtle Research Contributes to Special Edition of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences

Being Giant: Why are mammals not as big as dinosaurs?

Speaker Series 2015: “Being Giant: Why are mammals not as big as dinosaurs?” The Royal Tyrrell Museum was pleased to present the return of its popular annual Speaker Series on January 8, 2015 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Theodor, Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Calgary, entitled “Being Giant: … Continue reading Being Giant: Why are mammals not as big as dinosaurs?

Devil’s Coulee: Alberta’s dinosaur egg site

Palaeontological resources in Alberta are protected under the Historical Resources Act. This not only includes fossils, but also palaeontological significant sites. There are three sites designated in the province: the Willow Creek Hoodoos, Grande Cache Trackways, and Devil’s Coulee Dinosaur Egg Site (Devil’s Coulee). The Resource Management program at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology … Continue reading Devil’s Coulee: Alberta’s dinosaur egg site

Distance Learning – Connecting to Experts!

The Distance Learning Program is part of the Education section at the Royal Tyrrell Museum. Many schools across Alberta make the trek to Drumheller for field trips and participate in on-site educational programming, but there are many people who will never get the chance to visit the Museum in person. The Distance Learning Program was … Continue reading Distance Learning – Connecting to Experts!

Alberta’s Fossil Protection Legislation

Alberta’s palaeontological resources (fossils) became legally protected on July 5, 1978 when they were added to the province’s Historical Resources Act (HRA). This is the legislation and its associated regulations that we use to preserve and protect Alberta’s plentiful fossils. I will discuss the finer details of Alberta’s fossil legislation and protection strategies in future … Continue reading Alberta’s Fossil Protection Legislation

When a “Big One” is Found – What happens behind the scenes

When companies (or anyone, for that matter) encounter fossils while excavating, the Alberta Historical Resources Act requires them to report the find to Alberta Culture via the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology. It is then up to us to determine what has been found, and how to get it out of the way as quickly … Continue reading When a “Big One” is Found – What happens behind the scenes

Welcome!

Welcome to the official blog of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology! We are launching the blog with a series of posts from our Resource Management Program, whose staff we fondly refer to as the “fossil cops.” This series will address some common questions regarding fossil collecting and ownership in Alberta and will introduce you … Continue reading Welcome!