How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

With the cold weather and the short days, it’s safe to say that most people are missing summer. For our palaeontologists though, the winter months are an important part of the research process. In summer, they go out in the field to dig up new specimens. Winter is the time for analyzing what they’ve collected, … Continue reading How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

Speaker Series 2017: Extinction of Mainland and Island Mammoth Populations in Alaska 6,000 Years Ago

The extinction of mammoths is the most prominent of Late Pleistocene extinctions that wiped out nearly 70% of large mammals (megafauna) from western Europe through South America about 10,000 years ago. However, on small islands off the coast of Alaska and Siberia, populations of mammoths persisted for many thousands of years after mainland populations disappeared. … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Extinction of Mainland and Island Mammoth Populations in Alaska 6,000 Years Ago

Speaker Series 2017: Almost Like Being There: New Approaches to Deciphering Animal Behaviour from Trace Fossils

The study of ichnology, or trace fossils, is a fascinating field of geology that provides a window into the behaviour of ancient animals. While body fossils help us to understand the morphology of an animal, trace fossils (whether they are footprints, bite marks, or nests) provide evidence that allows us to make inferences about how … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Almost Like Being There: New Approaches to Deciphering Animal Behaviour from Trace Fossils

Speaker Series 2017: Canadian Volcanoes, eh? Active Volcanoes on Canada’s Ring of Fire

Recent volcanic activity in western Canada is not widely recognised, despite the occurrence of at least four important eruptions over the last 4,000 years. This is not surprising given the low eruption rates, the remoteness of Canadian volcanoes, and the low population density in volcanic areas. One of the few events with any confirmed observations … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: Canadian Volcanoes, eh? Active Volcanoes on Canada’s Ring of Fire

Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

Congratulations to the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeoichthyology Research Assistant, Dr. Julien Divay. A paper which he coauthored is one of publishing company Elsevier's top five most cited articles from the journal Cretaceous Research for the past three years. Why is this? Dr. Divay explains: The article describes dinosaur ichnoassemblages (assemblages of trace fossils, in this case footprints … Continue reading Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

Speaker Series 2017: How Did Birds Get Their Wings? Feathered Ornithomimids from Alberta Shed Light on the Origin of Wings

The discovery of the first feathered dinosaurs in 1998 irrevocably changed the perception of the physical appearance of dinosaurs. No longer the scaly reptiles of our imaginations, these animals were covered with feathers similar to birds. Since that first discovery, over 40 different species of dinosaurs are now known to have been covered with feathers … Continue reading Speaker Series 2017: How Did Birds Get Their Wings? Feathered Ornithomimids from Alberta Shed Light on the Origin of Wings

NASA Scientists Come To Dinosaur Provincial Park

Dinosaur Provincial Park received a special pair of visitors in August: Drs. Pan Conrad and Dina Bower of the Planetary Environments Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Dr. Conrad is an astrobiologist and mineralogist. She studies both minerals and extraterrestrial life. Dr. Bower is a palaeobiologist and geobiologist—she studies microbes from … Continue reading NASA Scientists Come To Dinosaur Provincial Park

Who Can Do Science? Everyone!

The Royal Tyrrell Museum believes that science should be accessible for everyone to understand and engage with. This is why we are involved with the citizen science movement. Citizen science is the concept of having civilians work with professionals to collect and measure scientific data together. To engage people with palaeontology, there are several programs … Continue reading Who Can Do Science? Everyone!

Stones, Bones, and Feathers: Ask A Curator Day 2016

If you could ask a museum curator anything, what would you ask? How they got their job? What their favourite specimen is? The actor who should play them on TV? On September 14, 2016 curators around the world took to Twitter for #AskACurator Day to answer these questions. The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Dr. François Therrien, … Continue reading Stones, Bones, and Feathers: Ask A Curator Day 2016

Lords of the Land: Science Meets Art

Our Foundations exhibit may have just opened, but the Royal Tyrrell Museum never rests in its quest to show visitors the most accurate palaeontology information in dynamic displays. In 2017, a new exhibit will replace Lords of the Land, a beautiful gallery that highlighted some of the Museum’s most remarkable theropod specimens. Installed in 2007, … Continue reading Lords of the Land: Science Meets Art