Speaker Series 2018: Eocene Vertebrate Fauna and Flora in Canada’s High Arctic

Eocene sediments for the Eureka Sound Group in Canada’s Arctic Archipelago preserve evidence of lush rain forests. The Eocene Epoch, 56 - 33.9 million years , was characterized by the rapid diversification of mammals. Alligators, turtles, birds and a large diversity of mammals, including early primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon, inhabited the rain forests of … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Eocene Vertebrate Fauna and Flora in Canada’s High Arctic

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Piecing Together the Skull of Daspletosaurus

This skull of Daspletosaurus torosus is one of the best-preserved theropod skulls in our collection. The skull is unique in that it is a disarticulated skull, where all the bones were found separately and were not crushed flat during fossilization. Daspletosaurus was a large tyrannosaur that lived 77.3 – 75 million years ago in Alberta … Continue reading Piecing Together the Skull of Daspletosaurus

Speaker Series 2018: Late Ice Age Mammals on Vancouver Island

As the last retreated 14,000 years ago, three giant mammal species—bison, ground sloth and short-faced bear—colonized Vancouver Island and the San Juan Islands. Megafauna (large or giant animals) fossils from the islands are rare due to acidic soils, but survive in pond deposits buffered by lime from underlying marine shells. Megafauna thrived south of the … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Late Ice Age Mammals on Vancouver Island

Speaker Series 2018: Evolutionary Experiments in the Early Tetrapod Form

The early origins of amphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians) are not well understood. This is due to their rarity in the early fossil record, as well as incomplete scientific understanding of four-legged vertebrate (tetrapod) evolution and the anatomy of possible amphibian relatives. Newly discovered fossils from the Triassic Period give us insights into the origins … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Evolutionary Experiments in the Early Tetrapod Form

New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New research by Dr. Caleb Brown published today in the journal PeerJ analyses two isolated ceratopsid horncores and contributes to our scientific understanding of the evolution of ceratopsid cranial display structures. Ceratopsidae were a diverse and abundant group of large-bodied horned dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous that are well-documented in the fossil record (e.g., Triceratops … Continue reading New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

Many dinosaurs, particularly ornithischians (bird-hipped dinosaurs) have elaborate bony projections like the horns and frills of ceratopsians, the crests of hadrosaurs, and the plates and spines of stegosaurs and ankylosaurs. The evolution and function of these features has been a subject of significant scientific debate. Current research proposes that these structures evolved in the context … Continue reading New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

From Discovery to Display: The Journey of the Castle River Hadrosaur

The Royal Tyrrell Museum collects thousands of fossils each year through fieldwork and reported finds by members of the public. But what exactly happens when a fossil is discovered? That answer is different for every specimen, but all fossils the Museum collects eventually end up either on display, or in the collection for further research … Continue reading From Discovery to Display: The Journey of the Castle River Hadrosaur

Fossils in Focus: Global Research of Ancient Alberta

The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s rotating exhibit, Fossils in Focus, reopens this Thanksgiving weekend with a new selection of specimens. Designed to highlight significant fossils from our vast collection, this year features current research being conducted by our scientists and other palaeontologists across the world from a variety of different disciplines. The diversity of research areas … Continue reading Fossils in Focus: Global Research of Ancient Alberta

Palaeoart: The Collaboration Between Art and Science

Palaeoart is the artistic interpretation of prehistoric animals and environments based on the fossil record. It is an increasingly complex and challenging art form. As new palaeontological discoveries are made, our view of the world in the deep past changes. Often, through scientific palaeo illustration—whether for a life-sized exhibit mural or a scientific press release—the … Continue reading Palaeoart: The Collaboration Between Art and Science

How a T. rex Travels from Gallery to Storage

How do you take down a Tyrannosaurus rex? Back in the Cretaceous Period, a mammal wouldn't stand a chance of being able to take down this apex predator; but for the mammals employed at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, taking down a T. rex is just another day at the office. This particular T. … Continue reading How a T. rex Travels from Gallery to Storage