Unravelling the Evolutionary Relationships of a New Family of Eutherian Mammals

A new family of mammals discovered by Dr. Craig Scott, Curator of Fossil Mammals, provides insights into the evolutionary relationship of eutherian mammals. This research helps better understand the organization of mammalian communities during the late Palaeocene (61.6 - 56 million years ago). Eutherian mammals bear live young that have been nourished in utero through … Continue reading Unravelling the Evolutionary Relationships of a New Family of Eutherian Mammals

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New Research Refutes Claims That Spinosaurus Was Semi-Aquatic

New research by Dr. Donald Henderson, Curator of Dinosaurs, refutes claims that Spinosaurus was adapted for a semi-aquatic mode of life. In his research, Dr. Henderson created three-dimensional, digital models of Spinosaurus and other predatory dinosaurs to test the centres of mass buoyancy and equilibrium of the animals when immersed in freshwater. Research published in … Continue reading New Research Refutes Claims That Spinosaurus Was Semi-Aquatic

New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

New research by Dr. Craig Scott, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Dr. Anne Weil, Oklahoma State University, and Dr. Jessica Theodor, University of Calgary, introduces a new species of multituberculate, Catopsalis kakwa, which challenges previous research proposing the evolution of larger body mass. This new research suggests a more complex evolutionary history of Taeniolabidoid multituberculates … Continue reading New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

Regaliceratops Returns to Display

The discovery and reveal of Regaliceratops peterhewsi was one of the most exciting dinosaur stories of 2015. Regaliceratops, a new genus and species of ceratopsid (horned dinosaur), is the most impressive horned dinosaur discovery since Triceratops. Regaliceratops has recently returned to permanent display in Dinosaur Hall. These photos document its long journey from discovery to … Continue reading Regaliceratops Returns to Display

New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

New research by Dr. Jordan Mallon, Canadian Museum of Nature, and Dr. Don Brinkman, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, introduces a new species of Basilemys turtle, Basilemys morrinensis. The species name honours the village of Morrin, Alberta for its role in the discovery of the specimen. Basilemys was a large, terrestrial turtle over one metre … Continue reading New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

New Research Explains the Upside-Down Preservation of Ankylosaurs

New research by Dr. Jordan Mallon, Canadian Museum of Nature, Dr. Donald Henderson, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Dr. Colleen McDonough and Dr. W.J. Loughry, Valdosta State University, explains the upside-down preservation of ankylosaurs in North America. Ankylosaurs were armoured, herbivorous dinosaurs. By the Late Cretaceous, ankylosaurs had diversified into two families, Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. They … Continue reading New Research Explains the Upside-Down Preservation of Ankylosaurs

New Species of Fishes Discovered in Sandstone Block on Display in Grounds for Discovery Exhibit

New collaborative research conducted on the fish block currently on display in the Grounds for Discovery exhibit, contributes to the reinterpretation of the family relationship of osteoglossomorph fishes. Dr. Allison Murray, University of Alberta, Dr. Darla Zelenitsky, University of Calgary, and Dr. Donald Brinkman and Andrew Neuman, Executive Director, from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology … Continue reading New Species of Fishes Discovered in Sandstone Block on Display in Grounds for Discovery Exhibit

New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New research by Dr. Caleb Brown published today in the journal PeerJ analyses two isolated ceratopsid horncores and contributes to our scientific understanding of the evolution of ceratopsid cranial display structures. Ceratopsidae were a diverse and abundant group of large-bodied horned dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous that are well-documented in the fossil record (e.g., Triceratops … Continue reading New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

Many dinosaurs, particularly ornithischians (bird-hipped dinosaurs) have elaborate bony projections like the horns and frills of ceratopsians, the crests of hadrosaurs, and the plates and spines of stegosaurs and ankylosaurs. The evolution and function of these features has been a subject of significant scientific debate. Current research proposes that these structures evolved in the context … Continue reading New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

There is much more to palaeontology than just dinosaurs, although they have a tendency to dominate in popular culture. Palaeontology is the study of the history of all life on Earth, through the fossil record. The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s researchers excavate and study fossils from a diverse range of fields. Our scientists study not only … Continue reading What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park