New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

New research by Dr. Jordan Mallon, Canadian Museum of Nature, and Dr. Don Brinkman, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, introduces a new species of Basilemys turtle, Basilemys morrinensis. The species name honours the village of Morrin, Alberta for its role in the discovery of the specimen. Basilemys was a large, terrestrial turtle over one metre … Continue reading New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

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New Research Explains the Upside-Down Preservation of Ankylosaurs

New research by Dr. Jordan Mallon, Canadian Museum of Nature, Dr. Donald Henderson, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Dr. Colleen McDonough and Dr. W.J. Loughry, Valdosta State University, explains the upside-down preservation of ankylosaurs in North America. Ankylosaurs were armoured, herbivorous dinosaurs. By the Late Cretaceous, ankylosaurs had diversified into two families, Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. They … Continue reading New Research Explains the Upside-Down Preservation of Ankylosaurs

New Species of Fishes Discovered in Sandstone Block on Display in Grounds for Discovery Exhibit

New collaborative research conducted on the fish block currently on display in the Grounds for Discovery exhibit, contributes to the reinterpretation of the family relationship of osteoglossomorph fishes. Dr. Allison Murray, University of Alberta, Dr. Darla Zelenitsky, University of Calgary, and Dr. Donald Brinkman and Andrew Neuman, Executive Director, from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology … Continue reading New Species of Fishes Discovered in Sandstone Block on Display in Grounds for Discovery Exhibit

New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New research by Dr. Caleb Brown published today in the journal PeerJ analyses two isolated ceratopsid horncores and contributes to our scientific understanding of the evolution of ceratopsid cranial display structures. Ceratopsidae were a diverse and abundant group of large-bodied horned dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous that are well-documented in the fossil record (e.g., Triceratops … Continue reading New Research Adds to the Understanding of Ceratopsid Evolution

New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

Many dinosaurs, particularly ornithischians (bird-hipped dinosaurs) have elaborate bony projections like the horns and frills of ceratopsians, the crests of hadrosaurs, and the plates and spines of stegosaurs and ankylosaurs. The evolution and function of these features has been a subject of significant scientific debate. Current research proposes that these structures evolved in the context … Continue reading New Research Analyses Body Armour of Borealopelta

What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

There is much more to palaeontology than just dinosaurs, although they have a tendency to dominate in popular culture. Palaeontology is the study of the history of all life on Earth, through the fossil record. The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s researchers excavate and study fossils from a diverse range of fields. Our scientists study not only … Continue reading What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

If you could invent a time machine and hop back 140 million years, to the earliest part of the Cretaceous Period, you would likely see at least one basal iguanodontidian or “iguanodontid.” These ornithischian dinosaurs (the group including ankylosaurs, stegosaurs, horned dinosaurs, and duck-billed dinosaurs) lived all around the globe. The basal iguanodontidians were those at … Continue reading Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Alberta is a great place for a dinosaur palaeontologist, with plenty of preserved skeletons and some of the best evidence for dinosaurs in the world. However, in the Willow Creek Formation of southwestern Alberta, which records the last few million years before the extinction of dinosaurs, only three kinds of dinosaur skeletons have been found: … Continue reading Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

With the cold weather and the short days, it’s safe to say that most people are missing summer. For our palaeontologists though, the winter months are an important part of the research process. In summer, they go out in the field to dig up new specimens. Winter is the time for analyzing what they’ve collected, … Continue reading How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

Congratulations to the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeoichthyology Research Assistant, Dr. Julien Divay. A paper which he coauthored is one of publishing company Elsevier's top five most cited articles from the journal Cretaceous Research for the past three years. Why is this? Dr. Divay explains: The article describes dinosaur ichnoassemblages (assemblages of trace fossils, in this case footprints … Continue reading Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years