New research analyses body armour of Borealopelta

Many dinosaurs, particularly ornithischians (bird-hipped dinosaurs) have elaborate bony projections like the horns and frills of ceratopsians, the crests of hadrosaurs, and the plates and spines of stegosaurs and ankylosaurs. The evolution and function of these features has been a subject of significant scientific debate. Current research proposes that these structures evolved in the context … Continue reading New research analyses body armour of Borealopelta

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What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

There is much more to palaeontology than just dinosaurs, although they have a tendency to dominate in popular culture. Palaeontology is the study of the history of all life on Earth, through the fossil record. The Royal Tyrrell Museum’s researchers excavate and study fossils from a diverse range of fields. Our scientists study not only … Continue reading What Happens When Two Research Fields Collide? A Case Study from Dinosaur Provincial Park

Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

If you could invent a time machine and hop back 140 million years, to the earliest part of the Cretaceous Period, you would likely see at least one basal iguanodontidian or “iguanodontid.” These ornithischian dinosaurs (the group including ankylosaurs, stegosaurs, horned dinosaurs, and duck-billed dinosaurs) lived all around the globe. The basal iguanodontidians were those at … Continue reading Dr. Donald Henderson finds first evidence of iguanodontids in Alberta

Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

Alberta is a great place for a dinosaur palaeontologist, with plenty of preserved skeletons and some of the best evidence for dinosaurs in the world. However, in the Willow Creek Formation of southwestern Alberta, which records the last few million years before the extinction of dinosaurs, only three kinds of dinosaur skeletons have been found: … Continue reading Eggshells from the Willow Creek Formation show that dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought at the end of the Age of the Dinosaurs in southwestern Alberta

How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

With the cold weather and the short days, it’s safe to say that most people are missing summer. For our palaeontologists though, the winter months are an important part of the research process. In summer, they go out in the field to dig up new specimens. Winter is the time for analyzing what they’ve collected, … Continue reading How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Palaeontology Fieldwork at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Part One

Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

Congratulations to the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeoichthyology Research Assistant, Dr. Julien Divay. A paper which he coauthored is one of publishing company Elsevier's top five most cited articles from the journal Cretaceous Research for the past three years. Why is this? Dr. Divay explains: The article describes dinosaur ichnoassemblages (assemblages of trace fossils, in this case footprints … Continue reading Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

NASA Scientists Come To Dinosaur Provincial Park

Dinosaur Provincial Park received a special pair of visitors in August: Drs. Pan Conrad and Dina Bower of the Planetary Environments Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Dr. Conrad is an astrobiologist and mineralogist. She studies both minerals and extraterrestrial life. Dr. Bower is a palaeobiologist and geobiologist—she studies microbes from … Continue reading NASA Scientists Come To Dinosaur Provincial Park

Even tadpoles have a fossil record

One of the most exciting things about the Royal Tyrrell Museum is that it’s more than a Museum, it's an active research facility, so there are exciting things happening all the time that further our understanding of ancient life. Dr. James Gardner, our Curator of Palaeoherpetology (the study of prehistoric reptiles and amphibians), has just … Continue reading Even tadpoles have a fossil record

New Royal Tyrrell Museum research investigates the pace of the dinosaur extinction, and why birds may have survived

One of the most intriguing and enduring aspects of dinosaurs is their extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. After decades of research into this topic, most palaeontologists can agree on several details regarding the dinosaur mass-extinction. First, the extinction was due, at least in part, to an asteroid impact with the Earth at … Continue reading New Royal Tyrrell Museum research investigates the pace of the dinosaur extinction, and why birds may have survived

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Researcher Co-edits Special Collection of Scientific Papers

How do scientists commemorate the career and accomplishments of their colleagues? Not with a party and gifts, but with a “Festschrift,” which is the publication of a special volume of scientific papers written and compiled in dedication to their colleague. Two former researchers at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology each have been honoured with … Continue reading Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Researcher Co-edits Special Collection of Scientific Papers