Museum Research Assistant Helped Write One of Most Cited Cretaceous Research Articles in Last Three Years

Congratulations to the Royal Tyrrell Museum’s Palaeoichthyology Research Assistant, Dr. Julien Divay. A paper which he coauthored is one of publishing company Elsevier’s top five most cited articles from the journal Cretaceous Research for the past three years. Why is this? Dr. Divay explains:

The article describes dinosaur ichnoassemblages (assemblages of trace fossils, in this case footprints and track ways) from the late Early Cretaceous of southern Shandong Province, in eastern China. In recent years, China has been investing money into the preservation and study of its geological/palaeontological heritage, by creating geoparks (China has 200 now, compared to Canada’s two parks, Stonehammer and Tumbler Ridge, and Tumbler Ridge was only recognised since the publication of our article), and inviting international researchers to work on them. That is how I was invited to tour multiple localities throughout China in 2012, including the Shandong sites, and to publish on these as part of an international collaboration led by Dr. Lida Xing (then a Ph.D. student and now a professor at China University of Geosciences, Beijing campus). We also took the opportunity to publish on a fish from Chongqing around the time I started at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in spring of 2015.

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Eight of the ten authors (from left): Julien Divay, Richard McCrea and Lisa Buckley (Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre, BC), Lida Xing (CUG, Beijing), Martin Lockley (University of Colorado, Denver), Qingzi Wu (Land and Resources Bureau, Shandong), Hendrik Klein (Saurierwelt Paläontologisches Museum, Neumarkt, Germany), Daniel Marty (Office de la culture, Paléontologie A16, Switzerland), and Yonggang Tang (palaeoartist).

The Cretaceous Research article “Diverse dinosaur ichnoassemblages from the Lower Cretaceous Dasheng Group in the Yishu fault zone, Shandong Province, China,” published in 2013, is co-authored by ten people based in China, the U.S., Switzerland, Germany, Poland, and Canada. I suspect that its popularity is based on three factors:

  • It is part of this push to publish the previously undocumented palaeo heritage of China, meaning that all of these new articles coming out in recent years are quite popular in China, and have a tendency to cite one another. This is likely all the more true for dinosaur tracks articles, since these were mostly ignored in China up until just a few years ago, and are now worked on by a relatively small group of people. In fact, the trip ended with the holding of the first Chinese Dinosaur Tracks Symposium in Qijiang with pretty much all of us.
  • The assemblages of Shandong are diverse, with at least two different groups of theropods, at least two different groups of sauropods differentiated by morphology and posture, and a mysterious tetradactyl (four-toed) track way that we tentatively (but, I think, reliably) attribute to a psittacosaur.
  • One of the theropod track ways is didactyl (two-toed), which is quite rare. This also gets a lot of attention, since it represents a deinonychosaurian (colloquially: a medium-sized raptor) track, and these tend to be crowd-pleasers
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Some of the didactyl tracks.

Dragon; fossil

Comments Divay: “One of my favourite pictures: As I went prospecting for more tracks around one of the localities, I found this statue of a pacing dragon, immediately above the didactyl track way (Lida and the crane we were using are visible at the bottom of the hill, to the right). 2012 was a year of the dragon, too, by the way.”

The paper is available in Cretaceous Research 45 (2013).

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