3D Printing a Daspletosaurus Skull for Display

Photogrammetry is the process of making measurements from photographs. Scientists can use photographs to create a digital model of an object or location. There are many different reasons why palaeontologists make digital models of specimens, from studying small and hard-to-see details, to making exact replicas (casts). Although we have the majority of this Daspletosaurus torosus … Continue reading 3D Printing a Daspletosaurus Skull for Display

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Types of Fossilization: How Fossils Form

Fossils are the remains and traces of ancient, once-living organisms. To qualify as a fossil, an organism usually must be more than 10,000 years old. Out of all the millions of species that have evolved and lived on this planet since life first began 3.9 billion years ago, very few have been preserved as fossils. … Continue reading Types of Fossilization: How Fossils Form

Unravelling the Evolutionary Relationships of a New Family of Eutherian Mammals

A new family of mammals discovered by Dr. Craig Scott, Curator of Fossil Mammals, provides insights into the evolutionary relationship of eutherian mammals. This research helps better understand the organization of mammalian communities during the late Palaeocene (61.6 - 56 million years ago). Eutherian mammals bear live young that have been nourished in utero through … Continue reading Unravelling the Evolutionary Relationships of a New Family of Eutherian Mammals

New Research Refutes Claims That Spinosaurus Was Semi-Aquatic

New research by Dr. Donald Henderson, Curator of Dinosaurs, refutes claims that Spinosaurus was adapted for a semi-aquatic mode of life. In his research, Dr. Henderson created three-dimensional, digital models of Spinosaurus and other predatory dinosaurs to test the centres of mass buoyancy and equilibrium of the animals when immersed in freshwater. Research published in … Continue reading New Research Refutes Claims That Spinosaurus Was Semi-Aquatic

The Discovery of Canada’s First Known Meat-Eating Dinosaur

On this day in 1884, Canada’s first known meat-eating dinosaur was discovered. Joseph Burr Tyrrell, a 26-year-old geologist working for the Geological Survey of Canada, happened across an impressive dinosaur skull while searching for coal deposits in the Red Deer River valley area. After joining the Geological Survey of Canada in 1881, Tyrrell discovered a … Continue reading The Discovery of Canada’s First Known Meat-Eating Dinosaur

Artistic Replicas Bring Microscopic Fossils to Life

Did you know that spores and pollen are the most abundant fossils found in the Cretaceous rocks that cover much of Alberta? Just as living plants do today, plants of the past reproduced using spores and pollen. Our former Curator of Palynology, Dr. Dennis Braman, has identified over 1000 different types of pollen and spores … Continue reading Artistic Replicas Bring Microscopic Fossils to Life

Rebuilding Our Reef: Palaeozoic Era Exhibit Reopens

As construction for our expansion progressed, the Devonian Reef diorama had to be moved to accommodate the opening to the new Learning Lounge. We took this opportunity to redevelop our Palaeozoic Era exhibit to showcase a greater diversity of animal life including new specimens from the Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous, and Permian periods. Since the … Continue reading Rebuilding Our Reef: Palaeozoic Era Exhibit Reopens

New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

New research by Dr. Craig Scott, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Dr. Anne Weil, Oklahoma State University, and Dr. Jessica Theodor, University of Calgary, introduces a new species of multituberculate, Catopsalis kakwa, which challenges previous research proposing the evolution of larger body mass. This new research suggests a more complex evolutionary history of Taeniolabidoid multituberculates … Continue reading New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

Regaliceratops Returns to Display

The discovery and reveal of Regaliceratops peterhewsi was one of the most exciting dinosaur stories of 2015. Regaliceratops, a new genus and species of ceratopsid (horned dinosaur), is the most impressive horned dinosaur discovery since Triceratops. Regaliceratops has recently returned to permanent display in Dinosaur Hall. These photos document its long journey from discovery to … Continue reading Regaliceratops Returns to Display

Speaker Series 2018: Looking for Fossils in Underground Caves

Caves of western North America preserve important fossil deposits that provide insight into biological changes that occurred during the last ice age. Fossiliferous cave deposits often contain large numbers of specimens, and sometimes preserve rare or uncommon specimens (e.g., soft tissue, dung). They also provide an important perspective on life at higher elevations. In Nevada, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Looking for Fossils in Underground Caves