The Discovery of Canada’s First Known Meat-Eating Dinosaur

On this day in 1884, Canada’s first known meat-eating dinosaur was discovered. Joseph Burr Tyrrell, a 26-year-old geologist working for the Geological Survey of Canada, happened across an impressive dinosaur skull while searching for coal deposits in the Red Deer River valley area. After joining the Geological Survey of Canada in 1881, Tyrrell discovered a … Continue reading The Discovery of Canada’s First Known Meat-Eating Dinosaur

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Artistic Replicas Bring Microscopic Fossils to Life

Did you know that spores and pollen are the most abundant fossils found in the Cretaceous rocks that cover much of Alberta? Just as living plants do today, plants of the past reproduced using spores and pollen. Our former Curator of Palynology, Dr. Dennis Braman, has identified over 1000 different types of pollen and spores … Continue reading Artistic Replicas Bring Microscopic Fossils to Life

Rebuilding Our Reef: Palaeozoic Era Exhibit Reopens

As construction for our expansion progressed, the Devonian Reef diorama had to be moved to accommodate the opening to the new Learning Lounge. We took this opportunity to redevelop our Palaeozoic Era exhibit to showcase a greater diversity of animal life including new specimens from the Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous, and Permian periods. Since the … Continue reading Rebuilding Our Reef: Palaeozoic Era Exhibit Reopens

New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

New research by Dr. Craig Scott, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Dr. Anne Weil, Oklahoma State University, and Dr. Jessica Theodor, University of Calgary, introduces a new species of multituberculate, Catopsalis kakwa, which challenges previous research proposing the evolution of larger body mass. This new research suggests a more complex evolutionary history of Taeniolabidoid multituberculates … Continue reading New Research Announces New Species and Challenges Evolutionary History of Multituberculates

Regaliceratops Returns to Display

The discovery and reveal of Regaliceratops peterhewsi was one of the most exciting dinosaur stories of 2015. Regaliceratops, a new genus and species of ceratopsid (horned dinosaur), is the most impressive horned dinosaur discovery since Triceratops. Regaliceratops has recently returned to permanent display in Dinosaur Hall. These photos document its long journey from discovery to … Continue reading Regaliceratops Returns to Display

Speaker Series 2018: Looking for Fossils in Underground Caves

Caves of western North America preserve important fossil deposits that provide insight into biological changes that occurred during the last ice age. Fossiliferous cave deposits often contain large numbers of specimens, and sometimes preserve rare or uncommon specimens (e.g., soft tissue, dung). They also provide an important perspective on life at higher elevations. In Nevada, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Looking for Fossils in Underground Caves

Speaker Series 2018: Fossils of Mongolia

Dinosaurs were first discovered in Mongolia in the early 20th Century by expeditions led by Roy Chapman Andrews of the American Museum of Natural History. This set off a great rush to find Asian dinosaurs, and multiple international expeditions discovered a treasure-trove of new dinosaur sites. Despite the long history of fossil collecting in Mongolia, … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Fossils of Mongolia

New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

New research by Dr. Jordan Mallon, Canadian Museum of Nature, and Dr. Don Brinkman, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, introduces a new species of Basilemys turtle, Basilemys morrinensis. The species name honours the village of Morrin, Alberta for its role in the discovery of the specimen. Basilemys was a large, terrestrial turtle over one metre … Continue reading New Species of Turtle Named in Honour of Community Where it Was Discovered

Speaker Series 2018: Ice Age Horses of the American West

Horses are icons of the American West and have a connection back to the last ice age. Native to North America, horses have been key players in ancient ecosystems for over fifty million years, and were mainstays of large mammal communities throughout the last ice age. Due to this success, Pleistocene horse fossils are abundant … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: Ice Age Horses of the American West

Speaker Series 2018: The World’s Best Preserved Armoured Dinosaur

In the spring of 2017, a new armoured dinosaur was publically unveiled with the opening of the exhibit Grounds for Discovery. Borealopelta markmitchelli was discovered in the oil sands mines in northern Alberta in 2011 and took nearly 6 years to prepare. Borealopelta is the best-preserved ankylosaur (tank-like, herbivorous dinosaurs) in the world and one … Continue reading Speaker Series 2018: The World’s Best Preserved Armoured Dinosaur